Category Archives: Impressionist paintings

Is it Two Cool or Two Warm?

Will it be two cool or two warm? You get to decide in my latest eBay auction oil paintings. The auction ends Sunday evening October 29th.

You can access the auction through my profile page when the paintings go live Sunday evening, October 22nd. Starting bid will be $49 for all, except for one which will only be a penny to keep it interesting! You’ll have to come back to find out! Hope you’ll join in on the auction. 🙂

This page will be updated with direct links to the auction. But, for now here’s a preview. You can click the image for a larger view.

sunset bluebonnet oil painting by William Byron Hagerman

Another Day 8×10 oil by Byron copyright 2017

rain clouds landscape oil painting by Byron

Lifting Clouds 8×10 oil by Byron copyright 2017

landscape oil painting sunset clouds by William "Byron" Hagerman

End of Day Colors 8×10 oil by Byron copyright 2017

sunset oil painting landscape by William Byron Hagerman

Last Rays 8×10 oil by Byron copyright 2017

So what are warm and cool paintings?

Some may wonder about the terminology of warm and cool, whether it be specific colors or an entire painting described in either term.

When it comes to colors, we tend to associate blue and green tones as being cool in comparison to warmer colors such as yellow, orange or red. Sort of like comparing fire and ice. A paintings overall color temperature can be classified as either warm or cool depending on what colors predominate the scene.

Color harmony can be lost if a painting has an equal distirubtion of warm and cool tones that compete with one another instead of lending support. The paintings above illustrate the idea behind a paintings overall color temperature.

So, will it be two cool or two warm? Happy bidding!

 

 

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Landscape Oil Paintings with Old Barns

In this series of three 8×10 landscape oil paintings with old barns is currently offered via eBay auction. You can click the image to go straight to the auction. Bids begin at only $49 for these gems. Each are painted on a linen panel!

This New Mexico inspired scene is also showcased in my short oil painting video lesson.

landscape oil painting old tin barn in New Mexico by Byron

Next is an old red barn found near Winnsboro, TX.

landscape oil painting old red barn by Byron

And finally in this series a landscape that was originally inspired from a trip to Montana.

oil painting landscape old red barn next to road

Hurry the auction ends Sunday, October 1st, at 8pm central time. Ending times are staggered by 7 minutes for each.

Thanks so much and happy bidding!

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Refining the Focal Area

In this segment on my oil painting demo of Paris France, “serious” work begins with refining the focal area, starting with the shadowed side of the middle building. This was done so the values of the adjacent sky and distant building in the sunlight could be judged against it. Cool reflected sky colors were added into the shadowed side which helps it recede.

oil painting demo refining a focal area by Byron

Work continued downward painting in the section between the two main buildings and into the courtyard area. Once dry the wrought iron gate was painted over it keeping the detail to a minimum with just enough to express its character.

oil painting demo paris france wrought iron gate entry

COMPOSITION REFINEMENT

Two important compositional changes in refining the focal area were also made from the original drawing. First, the woman pedestrian in the foreground returned to her apartment. She forgot something so she had to go. Her purpose was to act as a jump point for the eye to travel through the scene. However, a simpler approach of adding more potted flowers would serve the same purpose. Additionally, more emphasis is shifted to my client’s wife in the window. Blue colored French style planters brings balance to each side of the entry way. Plus it allowed more of my clients favorite colors to be added into the scene.

A slight fractional increase in the size of my clients wife in the window was the second compositional change along with changing her outfit’s color to purple, her favorite color. Adding a spot of red in the potted Geraniums next to her also prompts the eye to move to that area.

That warm touch of red adds a bit of color contrast to an area composed of cool colors. The reason for all these tones of violet, blue and even cool greens in this side of the building is that it’s at a different angle to the light. Therefore, being in shadow, it receives more reflected light from the sky.

PROGRESS

The next phase of work begins with painting in the light side of the middle building. Once this is dry, perspective angles will be checked and redrawn if necessary. More refinements and details will be added. Don’t misunderstand the term detail. This can also mean simplify and with so much architectural motifs on these buildings they need to be played down and that can be even more difficult than rendering them in tight detail.

Again the painting is not about the architecture, but my client’s wife and the time they shared in Paris. Everything in the painting has to support this concept. Additionally per their request the painting needs to be kept more impressionistic. In the end some elements will likely be softened. Even with buildings you can’t have all hard edges!

oil painting demo paris street scene

Hope you’ll come back to see more.

 

 

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OIL PAINTING DEMO of PARIS FRANCE

In Part two of my Oil painting demo of Paris France, the use of fluid washes of transparent and semi transparent color are higlighted. Liquin thinned with Turpenoid was mixed with paint and applied over the drawing. This is called the…

BLOCK IN STAGE

These thin color marks set the the mood of the painting. The lines of the drawing were reinforced with thinned paint in the previous session and left to dry. Therefore these washes would not disturb my careful drawing!

With the wash having set up a bit, opaque color was added to certain passages. This is most noticeable in the trees, cirtroen car and people. Keep in mind, nothing is complete at this stage.

oil painting demo paris street scene

COLOR CHOICES

My clients favorite colors included purple, blue and green. Therefore various mixes of violet and blue dominate the underpainting. Orange, being the compliment of blue is added to the sky. Also a transparent wash of orange is brushed over the street area. Various opaque broken colors of violet and blue violet are added on top. Some of the orange underpainting shows through which gives a sparkle effect.

oil painting demo paris france street scene

Here’s another zoomed in area. Remember the paint is being applied in a very transparent and loose manner. Refining details will come later.

oil painting detail block in stage demo painting paris france

A HINT OF MONET

Artist Claude Monet, founder of the French Impressionists, is a favorite of my clients wife. Therefore my alter ego is attempting to add a little hint of Monet in the brush work. If you look at the following detail of a Monet painting you’ll observe that nothing is just one color. This multitude of smaller flecks of color when viewed from a distance will come together producing a visual mixture!

My underpainting reminds me to render a similar effect in future sessions as more opaque thick colors are applied.

detail of claude monet painting

Thanks for visiting today! More sharing to come!

 

 

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Commissioned Oil Painting of Paris France

With my latest commissioned oil painting of Paris France, a unique perspective drawing challenge arose that required a judicious amount of artistic license.

My client and his wife visited the Musée d’Orsay in Paris France due to her love of impressionist art. Desiring an impressionist painting as a reminder of their trip which included staying in a lovely rented apartment near the Eiffel Tower.

The inspiration photo was taken using an iPhone in panoramic mode which created extreme distortion.  As you can see, Paris looks to be in the midst of an earthquake! My client’s wife in the window doesn’t seem to notice.

Here’s what was done to stop the earthquake and turn an unbelievable perspective into an artistic arrangement.

A LITTLE HELP FROM A PHOTO PROGRAM

Using a free photo program (GIMP) and its perspective tool to straighten up the buildings was the first task. Although it’s not really a perspective tool as it couldn’t correct everything.

With a supplied street address, and using Google’s Street View a better understanding of the surroundings was achieved. In reality, the buildings are parallel. However, with two unchangeable elements, (client’s wife looking out the window at her husband and the Eiffel Tower in view) the scene cannot be painted as it actually is.

Paris street view

ARTISTS LICENSE TO THE RESCUE

To make the scene believable imagine the buildings as being pie shaped and positioned at a corner street. To strengthen the concept, a mock up of paper was used to represent the buildings and then positioned at a corner of a table which represents the edge of the street.

Mock paper buildings for perspective

Equipped with this information work began on a modified photo/drawing montage. Height was added so the street could be included. Adding a vintage Citroen car and some other people, it kept Paris from looking deserted. These “extras” will act as visual aids in leading the eye through the composition. Ultimately color will also play a part in directing the eye back to my client’s wife and enliven the composition.

oil painting composition of Paris and Eiffel Tower

Here’s the completed drawing on canvas which is 15×30 in size. I’m sure more adjustments in perspective will be made as I paint. Being primarily a landscape artist this has been a fun challenge for my alter ego Byron!

Composition on canvas of Paris. Commissioned painting by Byron copyright 2017

Stay tuned as work on the painting continues. More sharing to come!

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Longhorn Cow and Calf (Mama’s Baby)

My latest offer for eBay auction is of a longhorn cow and calf titled Mama’s Baby. I photographed this pair near Poteet, Texas. The bluebonnets this particular year were abundant! You can all but feel the love and affection this Mama has for it’s young.

Bluebonnet oil painting with Texas Longhorn cow and calf by Byron

Mama’s Baby 8×10 oil by Byron copyright 2017

Although I’m primarily a landscape artist I couldn’t help but try my hand at this small 8×10 rendering of two lovely living creatures under my Byron signature.

Don’t miss the auction. It ends Sunday April 30th 8pm central time. Click here to view Mama’s Baby and put in your bid.

I also have two still life paintings as well on auction. Both contain grapes and a couple of my favorite vases. Be sure to check them out!

My Little Vase

Raku Vase

Thanks for visiting today!

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Benefits of Painting a Still Life

You’re the Conductor!

What are the benefits of painting a still life? This question came back to mind while preparing paintings for my exhibit at the Winnsboro Art & Wine Festival. The show wouldn’t be complete without having a painting or two featuring the fruit of the vine (grapes) which I show here done by my alter ego Byron. A nice departure from my landscapes. There are several benefits of painting a still life and right off the bat you get to be the conductor of your painting!

still life oil painting with grapes vase candle by Byron

My Little Vase 12×9 oil by Byron copyright 2016

Unlike landscapes you get to have total control over the lighting, color harmony and the subject matter. For landscapes you’re at the mercy of the weather. Many times I’ve wished for sunlight but instead overcast skies with no sign of them leaving anytime soon. Or hoping for brilliant fall foliage only to get dull shades of burnt orange or worse, no leaves on the trees! That brings us to another benefit: Timing!

No Timing Constraints; More Benefits of Painting a Still Life

Another advantage of painting a still life is that there are no time constraints. Unless of course you’re on a deadline to complete a painting or if you’re painting flowers and they’ve started to wilt or the fruit is starting to rot then that’s yucky. In which case you might be painting a little too slow. But, aside from those an artist can orchestrate a simple or complex composition as he or she wishes and study the scene at leisure with all it’s intricacies of color, light and shadow as it describes the various forms.

Since the scene is set and unmovable an artist will have ample time to work on drawing from life, which is an invaluable skill as opposed to seeing a flat image (photo) and drawing from it.

Still life paintings are also beneficial in that the objects form is more readily discernible. These forms are often oval, rectangular, cylindrical, cone shaped or combinations. These same geometric forms underlie objects in the landscape. If you learn to properly shade these forms in a still life with a single source of light, you will better understand how to shade other objects whose structure incorporates these various forms in the landscape.

still life oil painting with raku vase grapes orange by Byron

Raku Vase 9×12 oil by Byron copyright 2016

Communicating a Theme

Another benefit of painting a still life, is being able to communicate a story. But, does that mean that all the objects have to relate to one another? If you wish for a rustic theme, does it mean you have to leave out something elegant or vice versa? No! As long as the theme visually harmonizes and creates interest.  As an example here is a frame style combination that is both rustic and elegant. So they can work together, just as in a still life!

frame corner style of rustic and elegance

Rustic and Elegant frame style

The benefits of painting a still life are valuable both to the newbie artist and a good reminder to someone like me who hasn’t tried their hand at a still life in sometime. I have to say it was a lot of fun! Plus, I was able to render each of these still life paintings in one alla prima painting session. (All at once) Perhaps one day I will do a William Hagerman signature still life painting!

Would love to hear your thoughts about my still life work? As the Winnsboro show approaches I’ll be posting more of the art to be in the exhibit. Thanks for reading!

One last reminder before I go, is my latest eBay auction work going on now until 6PM Pacific Time on Tuesday October 18th. Fall is in the air in this mountain setting. Inspired by a trip near Trinidad, Colorado.

The Call of Autumn 9x12 oil by Byron for eBay auction

The Call of Autumn 9×12 oil by Byron for eBay auction

You can access the auction from my eBay profile page.

 

 

 

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Decorating: Color Coordinating with Artwork

When it comes to decorating, a color palette is often chosen beforehand in that the walls have been painted, the furniture and accessories are bought and then lastly the hunt is on for the artwork to fill the walls. Then you find a piece of art you have fallen in love with but it doesn’t match your decor or color scheme. Bummer. I hate this approach personally, because it often deprives you of art work that you would love to have. Plus somewhere upon saying “it doesn’t match my decor” an artist just cringed or rolled over in their grave. Instead try this approach in color coordinating with artwork.

Buy the art you love first. What I will show you next is a simple and effective way to color coordinate a color scheme to the artwork you have fallen in love with, using the paint program on your computer. Other photo programs can also be used, but might be more technical for the novice.

Start by taking a good digital photo of your art. Then download it onto your computer. Open the photo of the artwork with your Paint program. I’m on a Windows platform, but I imagine a Mac has something similar. Here I’m showing one of my Byron paintings.

Color Coordinating 1a

Notice that the photo has little handles at the corners and on the right side in the middle is a little box, place your mouse/curser over it and when it turns into an arrow drag it outwards to the right creating a blank white area.

Color Coordinating 2a

Next, look at the tools section for the color picker. Select the color picker and then use it to click on an area of color that you like in the photo of the artwork.

Color Coordinating 3a

Next look at the shapes section and select the square. Drag the shape out onto the blank white area. Then go back to tools and select the color fill then go back and hover over the square you just made and click it to color fill it with the color you selected.

Color Coordinating 5b

Repeat the process by selecting another color, create a box and color fill it until you have the number of colors you want.

Color Coordinating with artwork

Once you have your favorite colors picked save your image as a jpeg. I first saved it to my desktop and then I copied it my dropbox which is an app installed on my computer and iphone. Now I can access the photo I created on my phone. If I were going shopping for wall paint, curtains, accessories, furniture or whatever, I have a color palette at my fingertips saved on my mobile device that will guide me in my color choices. Now you’ll never have to say, “it doesn’t match my decor.” This can also be used to update a current color scheme by selecting new color choices using your current artwork.

The above illustrated Byron painting is also one of four new paintings up for auction on eBay. While the auction is still active the listings will show up on my user profile. Once there you can click on the paintings to go to the auction page. My auctions have no reserve and bidding starts at only a penny!

Here are the other Byron paintings:

Impressionist sunset oil paitning by Byron

Texas landscape bluebonnet oil painting by Byron

landscape oil painting of clouds impressionist oil by Byron

Thanks for reading! Would love to hear your comments.

 

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Landscape Oil Painting Commission

Recently I was contacted by Distinctive Art Source which is one of only two premiere healthcare art consultancies working exclusively in healthcare in the United States requesting a bluebonnet landscape oil painting commission for the National Intrepid Center of Excellence at Fort Hood. The painting is to be displayed in the reception area. When I asked about the size it was to be a 48″x72″ painting and will be under my Byron signature. This allowed me to keep the price within budget.

Aside from working on a couple of murals in the past, this will be my largest studio painting ever! I’m really looking forward to working on this painting.

My first challenge was the canvas itself. The finished work will be shipped rolled. Thus I would need to stretch the canvas in order to paint it, then undo it in order to ship it. Sounded like a lot of extra work. Could it be made simpler? YES!

I found a great product called Genie Canvas. It’s a collapsible canvas. It all comes in a sturdy tube which is reusable and is a rather unique system. No special tools were required to assemble the canvas. Including the time to open the package, laying out the canvas and assembling it took me about 10 minutes.

Here’s a video showing how the canvas is put together.

And here’s my canvas on the easel. You can see part of my sketch on the canvas. It was done so with cobalt blue thinned with Turpenoid (odorless thinner) and a brush. You can click the image for a larger view.

48x72 commissioned oil painting by Byron copyright 2015

48×72 commissioned oil painting by Byron copyright 2015

The painting you partially see leaning on the bottom edge of the canvas is my latest commission for Sherwood Galllery in Houston, TX. Here it is below.

 

 

 

 

bluebonnet landscape oil painting by William Hagerman

Spring Unfolding 18×24 oil by William Hagerman copyright 2015

I hope you’ll follow along in the next few weeks as I complete this large commissioned painting detailing it’s development.

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Impressionist Landscape Oil Paintings

Hagerman Art would like to introduce to you the art work of Byron. Who is Byron? Well, it’s me. Byron is my alter ego and he paints impressionist landscape oil paintings.

I decided to add a totally different painting style in addition to my realistic work. However, I did not want to confuse anyone by signing my name William Hagerman on the works, because my name that is associated with my realistic landscape paintings is known for a particular style and technique. So my alter ego Byron was born.

Here’s a preview of several new paintings in my impressionist style.

Although Byron has been a part of me all along. You see Byron is my middle name. But, it didn’t get used very much except when I was young and my mother wanted to get my attention. Generally it went something like: “William Byron, get inside this house before I count to three. One… Two…

Anyway, I always liked my middle name so now I get to use it with my impressionist painting style. These impressionist landscape oil paintings are available directly from me via my eBay auctions, commissions, or I have some small 5×7 paintings on my primary website.

You can see what products I have in regards to my impressionist work here: http://hagermanart.com/art_by_byron/products.htm

Also you can view my eBay listings for my impressionist works here: http://ebay.com/usr/hagermanart

These are also up for auction on eBay until Sunday August 17, 2014. Auction ending around 6 PM Pacific Time.

Would love to know what you think about the new style.

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