Author Archives: William

Longhorn Cow and Calf (Mama’s Baby)

My latest offer for eBay auction is of a longhorn cow and calf titled Mama’s Baby. I photographed this pair near Poteet, Texas. The bluebonnets this particular year were abundant! You can all but feel the love and affection this Mama has for it’s young.

Bluebonnet oil painting with Texas Longhorn cow and calf by Byron

Mama’s Baby 8×10 oil by Byron copyright 2017

Although I’m primarily a landscape artist I couldn’t help but try my hand at this small 8×10 rendering of two lovely living creatures under my Byron signature.

Don’t miss the auction. It ends Sunday April 30th 8pm central time. Click here to view Mama’s Baby and put in your bid.

I also have two still life paintings as well on auction. Both contain grapes and a couple of my favorite vases. Be sure to check them out!

My Little Vase

Raku Vase

Thanks for visiting today!

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How to Choose a Color Palette

When it comes to painting, no two artists seem to agree on how to choose a color palette. After all, painting is subjective as it reflects the temperament of the artist and his or her own color sense. A student or newcomer to painting is often left scratching their head as to what colors are best. It’s then compounded by so many choices as to brands of paint. This post hopefully will adequately address both issues.

how to choose a color palette

COLOR SELECTION

When choosing a palette it should be capable of producing vivid mixtures of all 12 hues on the color wheel.
Basic color theory states that the 3 primaries of yellow, red and blue when intermixed will produce all other colors. Then along with white and black to produce tints and shades of those color is all that’s needed. In reality that’s not the case. What we often think of as being a primary yellow, red and blue from our childhood school days will not produce all the hues on a color wheel to their full spectrum of intensity.

A BETTER CHOICE ON HOW TO CHOOSE A COLOR PALETTE

In printing, inks used to reproduce a color image are yellow, cyan and magenta. Just like your printer at home. Paints closely matching this would be Cadmium Yellow Light or Pale, Permanent Rose or Quinacridone Rose and Phthalo Blue. The intensity of the secondary colors when mixing any two of these primary colors is much improved.

So are these 3 colors enough to produce a full spectrum range? Not really. It can further be improved by adding a purchased premixed color corresponding to one of the secondary colors in the green, violet and orange range. Which ones? The colors of choice are: Ultramarine Blue (For blue violet), Phthalo Green or Winsor Green (For blue green) and Cadmium Scarlet Red. (For Red orange) Alternatively you could use Cadmium Red Light. Adding Titanium White and either Ivory or Oxide black and you have a basic set of 6 colors plus white and black.

To get the most intensity, mix your primary with one of these tubed colors to get your remaining secondary and intermediate colors which are often referred to as tertiary colors. For example to get green you normally mix yellow and blue. In this set up you mix the yellow with the Phthalo Green. Cadmium Yellow Light added to Scarlet Red will produce vivid oranges. Permanent Rose added to ultramarine blue will produce vivid violets.

The List of Basics

  • Cadmium Yellow Light or Pale (yellow)
  • Permanent Rose or Quinacridone Rose (red)
  • Phthalo Blue (Blue)
  • Cadmium Scarlet Red (Red Orange)
  • Ultramarine Blue (Blue Violet)
  • Phthalo Green or Winsor Green (Blue Green)
  • Titanium White
  • Ivory or Oxide Black

Likely you will not be painting with such vivid colors. To dull the intensity you mix their compliments. In theory those colors are opposite on the color wheel. Sometimes when working with these pigments a compliment that is not directly across may produce a more pleasing result. This is where actually taking your paint and mixing colors is beneficial. If you were a hair stylist you couldn’t call yourself one if you never cut hair. You can’t rely on the work of others. You have to do the work yourself. Mix your own colors. Learn how they interact as you mix. Stop relying on all those printed color wheels and charts. Make your own.

In time, you can add other colors to this basic set. I like having a variety such as the various earth tones in the dull orange and brown ranges such as Burnt Sienna or Transparent Oxide Red and Burnt Umber. Some colors have unique pigments and the way they behave in a mixture can’t be duplicated with this basic set. So having some optional colors expands your color range. In time you will find which colors fit your own aesthetics.

Brands of Paint

Just as deciding on which colors to buy, choosing within what brands can also be daunting from the amount of choices. In my opinion, buy the best you can afford. Price is a pretty good indicator as to quality. Good paints produce better color mixtures. I enjoy some colors in one brand as opposed to the same in another.

In the following link a rather extensive review is given regarding many of the popular brands of paint with pros and cons. I agree (for the most part) with statements on this site. Again it boils down to a personal choice. I hope this will give you a good starting point when it comes to choosing your palette of colors and the available brands of paint that are out there. Happy color mixing!

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New Bluebonnet Oil Painting

Springtime came early hear in Texas and due to drier conditions the bluebonnets were not as plentiful, but not my new bluebonnet oil painting! It is full of bluebonnets and rich spring hues.

Titled “Spring Consonance” it resonates with melodic soothing paint tones generated by beautiful morning light and cool shadows.

This larger format measures 24×36 and would make a striking center piece of art for you home or office. This painting is currently available direct from me! Financing is available. To learn more and purchase click this link: New Bluebonnet Oil Painting.

bluebonnet oil painting by William Hagerman

Spring Consonance 24×36 oil by William Hagerman copyright 2017 $5500.00

If you have any questions on this or possible commissioned work, please feel free to contact me.

Hope you enjoyed viewing my latest work! Thanks for visiting my blog.

 

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Why is Art Important?

Curiosity made my recently type the question of why is art important into a search engine. Well, there’s no lack of other blog articles about it, all with varying viewpoints. As an artist, art is important to me, because that’s how I make my living. However, I’m not that philosophical in forming an answer except for posing another question. Can you imagine a world without art?

Why is Art Important thinker

Why Is Art Important?

That’s right. No art museums, no old master works, nothing to give a glimpse into the past, no galleries, no art fairs on a sunny weekend,  nothing on your walls to bring beauty into your life, no beautified parks with garden sculptures…. can you think of more?

How did that contemplation make you feel? Now ask yourself, why is art important, to you?

Please comment. I’d love to hear your thoughts.

Feeling like you need some art in your life or maybe add a little spot of color somewhere in your home? I have you covered!

Here’s some artwork currently on my eBay auction if you need a little spot of color in your life. Click on the paintings title to go straight to the auction. Happy bidding! Note: Paintings come unframed. Frame for illustration only. Click the image for a larger view. The auction ends for the first two paintings on Sunday March 25th at 8 PM Central Time and the last two on Tuesday March 28th at 8 PM Central Time.

landscape oil painting with road old barn by Byron

After the Rain 9×12 oil by Byron

Texas hill country autumn oil painting by Byron

Color by the Creek 9×12 oil by Byron

Texas hill counntry autumn spanish oaks landscape oil painting

Dos Spanish Oaks 9×12 oil by Byron

Texas hill country autumn spanish oaks landscape oil painting by Byron

Tree of Color 9×12 oil by Byron

Thanks for visiting my blog today. All my best.

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Moody Skies

Years ago I learned to play on the piano an old song titled “Twilight Time.” A portion of the lyrics went this way: Purple shades of night are falling, it’s twilight time…” Those words fit well for my series of moody skies for my eBay auction ending Sunday March 19th 6 PM Pacific Time or 8 PM central. The endings are staggered by 7 minutes. These 3 paintings have a minimum bargain price bid of $39.00 each.

I enjoyed so much painting the last series of sunsets and sunrises I just had to do more but this time including the lesser luminary!  I hope you enjoy them. Click on the title of the painting to go to the auction or visit my profile page on eBay. Happy bidding! Of course click the image to get a larger view!

impressionism oil painting sunset with water reflection by Byron

Contemplative Sunset 8×10 oil by Byron copyright 2017

moon rise oil painting by Byron

Full Moon Rising 8×10 oil by Byron copyright 2017

Misty moon oil painting by Byron

Misty Moon 8×10 oil By Byron copyright 2017

Thanks for viewing and visiting my blog today!

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Painting in a Series: Sunrise and Sunsets

Painting in a Series is often a great way to think about composition and different color schemes  as it applies to the same subject. In this case a series of sunrise and sunsets for my eBay auction ending Sunday evening February 19, 2017 at 8PM Central time.

My new Byron works for this auction are painted on linen panels and measure 8×10.

Minimum bidding starts at $39 for each of these paintings. Click on the titles under each image to go straight to the auction page. Hurry as the auction is ending soon.

Here they are!

This one is my favorite. Can’t you just imagine yourself along the banks and contemplating the beauty that surrounds you?

Another meditative painting at sunset. What’s that saying, “red sky at night sailors delight”?

A complimentary color scheme. This has an old vintage oil painting look to it.

I wonder if the fish along this stream would be biting this foggy morning? I’d hate to cast a line and disrupt that beautiful hazy reflection of the sun! The fish will have to wait.

Happy bidding. Hope you win!

http://ebay.com/usr/hagermanart

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Landscape Oil Painting Demo: Water Reflections

My first painting for the new year of 2017 is under my William Hagerman signature. It was a commissioned painting and I thought you might like to see how it was brought to fruition in another…

Landscape oil painting demo: water reflections

Landscape oil painting autumn water reflections by William Hagerman

Delightful Reflections 27×21 oil painting by William Hagerman copyright 2017

Inspiration for this Texas Hill Country painting came from a texted photo sent by a client of a spot on their ranch. Along with the request of a vertical format, key elements for the painting included the beautiful water reflections and tree up against the sky.

water reflections

Rough sketch for landscape oil painting demo

Composition Sketch

Using that criteria, and a marker pen, a rough composition sketch was made.

However, a problem existed requiring adjustments caused by reflections on the right side extending to the bottom edge which created a long unbroken vertical line. The solution was adjusting the design to include more blue sky reflection.

Remember, the goal is not to copy a photo but capture the essence of a scene and make a good painting.

 

The Painting Begins

With the composition sketch and photo as a guide, a sketch was made on canvas using thinned ultramarine blue and a small bristle flat brush. Additionally, a photo program was used to lighten and crop the photo. Having a computer monitor next to my easel made it convenient to zoom in on areas to see further details.

Work started from the center out, with the shadowed dark area painted first. Other values adjacent to it can then be compared and painted in.

oil painting demo landscape by William Hagerman

Progression of blocking in color and values continues, similar to placing pieces of a puzzle together. Ultimately the upper half of the painting will be completed before painting the water.

landscape oil painting demo step 2 by William Hagerman

Stay tuned for the next session as more work is done in finishing the block in stage.

Landscape Oil Painting Demo Water Reflections Part Two

Continuing with the block in stage, work is focused in the middle section having worked from the middle out. Now the left side is blocked in.

oil painting demo water reflections by William Hagerman

Additional details are also added to other vegetation that has previously been blocked in, further refining the shapes. After this the right hand side is given some focus adding more details to the trees.

oil painting demo water reflections by William Hagerman

Now the sky is blocked in painting around the larger limbs of the tree up against the sky. Some might ask why not paint all the sky first and then paint the tree? It’s a rule called painting fat over lean. Colors that have more oil content or that are slower drying should not be over painted with faster drying colors as cracking could result. The under layer should be “lean” in that there is less oil or medium added while upper layers are “fat” having more oil or medium which makes the top layer more flexible.

The distant hill is also refined. By the way I do not paint while the frame is on the painting. However, I like to see how the painting looks in it’s frame even at an early stage.

oil painting demo water reflections by William Hagerman

After the sky color is dry, I next add some faint clouds. Since white is more oily, plus I had medium in it, this top layer is more flexible than what’s under neath so I’m following the fat over lean rule.

oil painting demo water reflections by William Hagerman

Now comes the task of painting in the limbs and scattering of leaves on the silhouetted tree against the sky. A photograph would show this tree as black, however it’s not void of light so do not paint it as a black silhouette.  Your eye would be able to see into this darker area. A camera can’t do that.

oil painting demo water reflections by William Hagerman

After the previous stage was dry I go back and add additional clouds and do some modifications in the silhouetted tree. The tree wasn’t happy or at least I wasn’t happy with it. Details are now painted in the grassy area on the banks of the stream and essentially the upper half is brought to a completion.  Next will come the reflections.

oil painting demo water reflections by William Hagerman

Before showing you the final stages I thought you would like to see a few up close views to get a better look at the details.

Painting Water Reflections the Final Stage

With the upper section complete a basic full color oil sketch is made of the reflections, being careful to take notice of their positioning. I also consult my reference photo. In painting reflections the brush strokes are vertical and edges kept soft.

After this layer dried, details are added in the water with most of the paint strokes being vertical. Horizontal strokes represent ripples in the water.

Final details are added again after the above session has dried. Such as indicating cloud reflections but these are kept to a minimum so as not to call attention thus keeping them subordinate. To facilitate working back into a dried area, I coat that section with a thin layer of medium. Doing so allows for better color matching and it makes blending easier.

After this I sign the painting using thinned paint and a small liner brush with a good point.

Landscape oil painting autumn water reflections by William Hagerman

Delightful Reflections 27×21 copyright 2017 by William Hagerman

Hope you enjoyed this Landscape Oil Painting Demo: Water Reflections!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Landscape Oil Paintings on Etsy

New Shop Opening “HagermanArtPaintings” on Etsy

After much thought my alter ego “Byron” decided to offer his landscape oil paintings on Etsy with his own shop named HagermanArtPaintings.

Landscape oil paintings on Etsy from Hagerman Art Paintings

Etsy Shop Page

Prompting this was a desire to find new audiences to share my work with. If nothing else, Etsy has some great statistical information that helps me get an idea of what people like. I first started offering my Byron work on eBay and I do not plan to eliminate the eBay avenue. It’s just good to spread your stuff around as you never know who might see it.

I like the format of Etsy as it appeals to the creative side and things that are hand made.

What to Expect at my Landscape Oil Paintings Etsy Shop?

Byron is wishing to experiment once again. Who knows you might even see a colorful abstract and more choices in painting sizes in the near future. But for those who enjoy my realistic landscape oil paintings under my William Hagerman signature, not to worry he’s not going anywhere. Matter of fact he’s gearing up for a commissioned painting! It’s to be a surprise so it’s hush hush for now. I’ll share when it’s done.

So I invite you to visit my Etsy shop. There’s a banner on the side bar that links to it. I hope my shop will be a favorite!

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Winnsboro Art & Wine Festival Video

My participation in the  Winnsboro Art & Wine Festival 2016 was an enjoyable weekend.Winnsboro Art & Wine Festival The weather was absolutely beautiful. I all but wanted to ditch the show and go exploring the countryside with camera in hand. The area is beautiful. But, then I wouldn’t have gotten to meet several nice folk from the area and share my art with them.

Here are a few pictures of my booth.

art show set up

During set up

art booth display hagerman art

set up complete

art show booth set up Hagerman art

set up complete another view

I especially wanted to thank my brother-in-law who helped with my show set up. I wouldn’t have got it done without his help.

I understand he is now inspired to try his hand at painting. His wife said he just had his first lesson and wonders if we we haven’t created a monster. We shall see. Maybe we’ll have a show together someday! Two monsters showing art.

If you didn’t get to attend and would like to see what the event was like, a video was produced for the event. I’m in the video at the one minute forty two second interval. Blink and you’ll miss it.  Just wish more of my art was shown rather than my stupid looking face. Ha!

 Winnsboro Art & Wine Festival Video

Regarding those who signed up for the free painting giveaway here is that announcement and a picture of the winner with her painting. Congrats to the winner and all who participated in the drawing!

 

 

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Winner of Oil Painting Announcement

Thank you to all who stopped by my art booth at the Winnsboro Art & Wine Festival show November 11- 12th and others who registered online for a painting give away! It was a fun weekend with beautiful weather that drew a nice crowd to the small community.

Now comes the time for the announcement of the winner for the following painting:

And the winner is: Drum roll please…. Karen Clark!

Wine glass with grapes oil painting

Taste of Wine 6×6 oil by Byron copyright 2016

After being notified via email of her win, she replied: ” I love everything that you do and I cannot wait to get my painting! I am both thrilled and honored to be the winner of this beautiful painting. William Hagerman’s paintings speak to my eyes and to my heart.  I don’t know whether the colors or the brush strokes are my favorite part. Maybe it’s everything all together that makes his work so striking and so unique. Thank you.”

K. Clark winner of William "Byron" Hagerman painting

K. Clark wins Hagerman painting!

 

 

 

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