Category Archives: Uncategorized

Bluebonnets at Sunrise

One of my first paintings although not bluebonnets at sunrise was still a bluebonnet painting nonetheless and over the years I’ve never tired of painting them. If practice makes perfects, then I’ve had a lot of practice. A gallery owner who has specialized in selling theses favored blue Texas flowers told me I was one of the best bluebonnet painters living. I appreciate that.

With such a subject that has been painted frequently not only by me and other artists, it can be a challenge to represent them differently. After all they grow in a region known for oak trees and hills, so there’s going to be repetition.

So, here’s a scene with a slightly different color scheme than some I’ve painted even though the elements of oak trees, hills and bluebonnets are the same. I hope you enjoy the glowing sun casting it’s first rays as the day begins to awake from its sleep upon a field of azure notes.

“Bluebonnets at Sunrise” can be purchased through my eBay auction that will begin Sunday October 6th, 2019 6pm pacific time and ends October 13th. When live, you can access the auction by logging into your eBay account and then visiting this page to view active items. Hope you win!

 

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When does art become priceless?

So when does art become priceless? Recently a combination including one of my paintings, tropical storm Imelda and a comment from a client gave added meaning and answer to the question.

First, when you think of something as being priceless it generally means you can’t put a monetary value on the item under consideration. In art, you might call to mind something purchased for X millions of dollars by some museum or extremely wealthy individual and let’s face it, puts something like that out of reach for most of us. Thus, you might consider it a priceless work of art. On the other hand it could be something of insignificant monetary value, but priceless to you. Perhaps a masterpiece drawing done by your child given to you as a gift. You treasure it and would never think of discarding or parting with it even if it looked like a Picasso that was done while blindfolded.

A heartfelt message

A very touching scenario came about when one of my eBay clients won a recent painting. It so happened that it coincided that the painting was shipped and en route when tropical storm Imelda hit the South East Texas area inundating the region with torrential amounts of rain. Concerned for his welfare and family, I sent a message. My client’s reply was touching and gave a new perspective on the piece he purchased. The following is an excerpt.

“Thanks my friend. It has been a tough 24 hrs. I live on a hill in between the border of Labelle and Fannett TX. Fannett registered 32” of rain. All my neighbors were flooded except 2, they share the same hill that we are on. My sons friend who lives on the other side of the road, (name withheld) was killed this morning, trying to rescue some horses. A downed power line got him. It’s been a real sad time with all this. I have a neighbor that has throat cancer, we got him out, he is real fragile, it took about 7 hrs, but he is safe now in LA. (Louisiana) I did take some time, and had a reflection on that painting. I keep a screen shot of my favorite paintings. This one that I won is my all time favorite, because it’s like the area I grew up in, by Enchanted Rock, very similar to scenery on Crabapple Road in Gillespie County. I found a slice of solace looking at the photograph of the painting. Thanks, that is what your art is capable of doing.”

The Painting Arrives

Once mail delivery was able to be resumed and the painting arrived he said: ” I received your painting today. It was unbelievable as expected. Today was the first day we received mail since the storm. It was a great surprise. Thanks for everything and look forward to seeing more of your painting in the future.”

This is the painting  we are talking about called “Sky Drama.”

William Byron Hagerman landscape oil painting bluebonnets at sunset

 

It would seem that in this instance my art brought something you can’t put a price tag on.  I so much appreciated his sharing his feelings. I’m honored.

 

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Vintage Texas Oil Painting

Vintage Texas Oil Painting

Whenever I think of a vintage Texas oil painting, several artists come to mind, such as Porfirio Salinas, Robert Wood and some early paintings by G. Harvey.

Painting by Porfirio Salinas

I enjoy looking at their works as it evokes the mood of an unmarred landscape and Texas imagery at its finest.

For me I also strive to evoke a similar mood and give a vintage feel to some recent impressionist works under my “Byron” signature. Two of which are up for auction on eBay.

 

 

A Vintage Mood

Spring Evening 8×10 oil by Byron copyright 2019

This painting recently sold for a nice high bid on eBay. The sunset behind the tree provides some drama and the gentle steam providing a restful mood.

 

 

 

 

A commissioned Byron painting of bluebonnets 8×10

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Now on eBay

The following auctions will be ending soon. You can access them through my profile page.

Texas landscape bluebonnet oil painting by William Byron Hagerman

Texas Vintage 8×10 oil by Byron copyright 2019

Texas Landscape oil painting by William Byron Hagerman

Rocks and Flowers 8×10 oil by Byron copyright 2019

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Hope you enjoyed viewing these Texas vintage inspired oil paintings.

 

 

 

 

 

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eBay Auction: North East Texas Landscape Oil Paintings

New Inspiration for my Texas Landscape Oil Paintings

After 36 years living in West Texas, we undertook a big change in moving to North East Texas settling in a small community about 100 miles north east of Dallas. My what a change this has been. However, for an artist, it’s such a beautiful area that has plenty of subject matter. Now I have plenty of new inspiration for my art work.

So after an absence for a time, I’m back to doing some painting and wanted to share my latest eBay auction featuring six of my Byron Signature works of some north east Texas Landscape Oil Paintings.

Here they are: Click on a title to go directly to the auction. Bidding Starts at $49. However, there’s one among the group that starts at only a penny! 🙂 The auction ends Sunday March 3rd between 6pm and 6:30 pm Pacific Time and 8pm 8:30pm central.


Thank you!

I appreciate you taking a look. Hope you win a painting!

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Is it Two Cool or Two Warm?

Will it be two cool or two warm? You get to decide in my latest eBay auction oil paintings. The auction ends Sunday evening October 29th.

Four Paintings up for Auction

To try your hand at bidding one of these works, you can access the auction through my profile page  or click the Title links for each painting below. Starting bid will be $49 for all, except for one which will only be a penny to keep it interesting! Hope you’ll join in on the auction. 🙂 Each are painted on linen panel.

You can click the images for a larger view.

sunset bluebonnet oil painting by William Byron Hagerman

Another Day 8×10 oil by Byron copyright 2017

rain clouds landscape oil painting by Byron

Lifting Clouds 8×10 oil by Byron copyright 2017

landscape oil painting sunset clouds by William "Byron" Hagerman

End of Day Colors 8×10 oil by Byron copyright 2017

sunset oil painting landscape by William Byron Hagerman

Last Rays 8×10 oil by Byron copyright 2017

So what are warm and cool paintings?

Some may wonder about the terminology of warm and cool, whether it be specific colors or an entire painting described in either term.

When it comes to colors, we tend to associate blue and green tones as being cool in comparison to warmer colors such as yellow, orange or red. Sort of like comparing fire and ice. A paintings overall color temperature can be classified as either warm or cool depending on what colors predominate the scene.

Color harmony can be lost if a painting has an equal distirubtion of warm and cool tones that compete with one another instead of lending support. The paintings above illustrate the idea behind a paintings overall color temperature.

So, will it be two cool or two warm? Happy bidding!

 

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Reworking an Oil Painting: Before and After

Reworking an oil painting: Before and after photos. Which do you like better?

In composing a painting, sometimes there’s a hard to define problem in which the solution doesn’t come to mind until later. Sometimes, much later. Such was the case with Lapis Hues of Spring a 2013 bluebonnet painting that was shown in a gallery, but never sold. Looking at it once again with a critical eye there was now clarity as to why it would never sell.

Perhaps I was experiencing a dark mood when I painted it, and subsequently cast its ugly shadow onto my painting. It was supposed to be a beautiful sunny spring day in Texas. The painting did not give off that impression.

bluebonnet oil painting

bluebonnet oil painting

Finding a Solution: Sunshine and Openness

The problem wasn’t in paint application or detail or for that matter the basic composition. What was wrong is that the mood of the painting was off. It lacked the feel of sunshine and openness.

Here’s a little exercise for you. Look at the two paintings and notice the differences which are fairly apparent. Click the images for a larger view. But ask yourself, how do the changes you see support the idea of sunshine and openness? You’ll see more openings in the trees. Openings that give glimpses of the landscape further away. There’s more contrast and intensity of colors and a little more variety in flowers and a reduction of the cactus which seemed too imposing in the original image.

A Special Offer

Reworking a painting this long after it was first done is something I rarely do. So with that in mind I’m also doing something I rarely do is offering this William Hagerman signature painting at nearly half for what one this size retails for. Currently this revised painting is offered on eBay as a fixed price item of $1600.00. Normal price for a16x20 varies from $2700- $3000.

Update: This painting is now sold.

My best,

William

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Longhorn Cow and Calf (Mama’s Baby)

My latest offer for eBay auction is of a longhorn cow and calf titled Mama’s Baby. I photographed this pair near Poteet, Texas. The bluebonnets this particular year were abundant! You can all but feel the love and affection this Mama has for it’s young.

Bluebonnet oil painting with Texas Longhorn cow and calf by Byron

Mama’s Baby 8×10 oil by Byron copyright 2017

Although I’m primarily a landscape artist I couldn’t help but try my hand at this small 8×10 rendering of two lovely living creatures under my Byron signature.

Don’t miss the auction. It ends Sunday April 30th 8pm central time. Click here to view Mama’s Baby and put in your bid.

I also have two still life paintings as well on auction. Both contain grapes and a couple of my favorite vases. Be sure to check them out!

My Little Vase

Raku Vase

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Moody Skies

Years ago I learned to play on the piano an old song titled “Twilight Time.” A portion of the lyrics went this way: Purple shades of night are falling, it’s twilight time…” Those words fit well for my series of moody skies for my eBay auction ending Sunday March 19th 6 PM Pacific Time or 8 PM central. The endings are staggered by 7 minutes. These 3 paintings have a minimum bargain price bid of $39.00 each.

I enjoyed so much painting the last series of sunsets and sunrises I just had to do more but this time including the lesser luminary!  I hope you enjoy them. Click on the title of the painting to go to the auction or visit my profile page on eBay. Happy bidding! Of course click the image to get a larger view!

impressionism oil painting sunset with water reflection by Byron

Contemplative Sunset 8×10 oil by Byron copyright 2017

moon rise oil painting by Byron

Full Moon Rising 8×10 oil by Byron copyright 2017

Misty moon oil painting by Byron

Misty Moon 8×10 oil By Byron copyright 2017

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Painting in a Series: Sunrise and Sunsets

Painting in a Series is often a great way to think about composition and different color schemes  as it applies to the same subject. In this case a series of sunrise and sunsets for my eBay auction ending Sunday evening February 19, 2017 at 8PM Central time.

My new Byron works for this auction are painted on linen panels and measure 8×10.

Minimum bidding starts at $39 for each of these paintings. Click on the titles under each image to go straight to the auction page. Hurry as the auction is ending soon.

Here they are!

This one is my favorite. Can’t you just imagine yourself along the banks and contemplating the beauty that surrounds you?

Another meditative painting at sunset. What’s that saying, “red sky at night sailors delight”?

A complimentary color scheme. This has an old vintage oil painting look to it.

I wonder if the fish along this stream would be biting this foggy morning? I’d hate to cast a line and disrupt that beautiful hazy reflection of the sun! The fish will have to wait.

Happy bidding. Hope you win!

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Landscape Oil Painting Demo: Water Reflections

My first painting for the new year of 2017 is under my William Hagerman signature. It was a commissioned painting and I thought you might like to see how it was brought to fruition in another…

Landscape oil painting demo: water reflections

Landscape oil painting autumn water reflections by William Hagerman

Delightful Reflections 27×21 oil painting by William Hagerman copyright 2017

Inspiration for this Texas Hill Country painting came from a texted photo sent by a client of a spot on their ranch. Along with the request of a vertical format, key elements for the painting included the beautiful water reflections and tree up against the sky.

water reflections

Rough sketch for landscape oil painting demo

Composition Sketch

Using that criteria, and a marker pen, a rough composition sketch was made.

However, a problem existed requiring adjustments caused by reflections on the right side extending to the bottom edge which created a long unbroken vertical line. The solution was adjusting the design to include more blue sky reflection.

Remember, the goal is not to copy a photo but capture the essence of a scene and make a good painting.

 

The Painting Begins

With the composition sketch and photo as a guide, a sketch was made on canvas using thinned ultramarine blue and a small bristle flat brush. Additionally, a photo program was used to lighten and crop the photo. Having a computer monitor next to my easel made it convenient to zoom in on areas to see further details.

Work started from the center out, with the shadowed dark area painted first. Other values adjacent to it can then be compared and painted in.

oil painting demo landscape by William Hagerman

Progression of blocking in color and values continues, similar to placing pieces of a puzzle together. Ultimately the upper half of the painting will be completed before painting the water.

landscape oil painting demo step 2 by William Hagerman

Stay tuned for the next session as more work is done in finishing the block in stage.

Landscape Oil Painting Demo Water Reflections Part Two

Continuing with the block in stage, work is focused in the middle section having worked from the middle out. Now the left side is blocked in.

oil painting demo water reflections by William Hagerman

Additional details are also added to other vegetation that has previously been blocked in, further refining the shapes. After this the right hand side is given some focus adding more details to the trees.

oil painting demo water reflections by William Hagerman

Now the sky is blocked in painting around the larger limbs of the tree up against the sky. Some might ask why not paint all the sky first and then paint the tree? It’s a rule called painting fat over lean. Colors that have more oil content or that are slower drying should not be over painted with faster drying colors as cracking could result. The under layer should be “lean” in that there is less oil or medium added while upper layers are “fat” having more oil or medium which makes the top layer more flexible.

The distant hill is also refined. By the way I do not paint while the frame is on the painting. However, I like to see how the painting looks in it’s frame even at an early stage.

oil painting demo water reflections by William Hagerman

After the sky color is dry, I next add some faint clouds. Since white is more oily, plus I had medium in it, this top layer is more flexible than what’s under neath so I’m following the fat over lean rule.

oil painting demo water reflections by William Hagerman

Now comes the task of painting in the limbs and scattering of leaves on the silhouetted tree against the sky. A photograph would show this tree as black, however it’s not void of light so do not paint it as a black silhouette.  Your eye would be able to see into this darker area. A camera can’t do that.

oil painting demo water reflections by William Hagerman

After the previous stage was dry I go back and add additional clouds and do some modifications in the silhouetted tree. The tree wasn’t happy or at least I wasn’t happy with it. Details are now painted in the grassy area on the banks of the stream and essentially the upper half is brought to a completion.  Next will come the reflections.

oil painting demo water reflections by William Hagerman

Before showing you the final stages I thought you would like to see a few up close views to get a better look at the details.

Painting Water Reflections the Final Stage

With the upper section complete a basic full color oil sketch is made of the reflections, being careful to take notice of their positioning. I also consult my reference photo. In painting reflections the brush strokes are vertical and edges kept soft.

After this layer dried, details are added in the water with most of the paint strokes being vertical. Horizontal strokes represent ripples in the water.

Final details are added again after the above session has dried. Such as indicating cloud reflections but these are kept to a minimum so as not to call attention thus keeping them subordinate. To facilitate working back into a dried area, I coat that section with a thin layer of medium. Doing so allows for better color matching and it makes blending easier.

After this I sign the painting using thinned paint and a small liner brush with a good point.

Landscape oil painting autumn water reflections by William Hagerman

Delightful Reflections 27×21 copyright 2017 by William Hagerman

Hope you enjoyed this Landscape Oil Painting Demo: Water Reflections!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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