Monthly Archives: September 2015

Oil Painting Demo of a Texas Landscape

Here in my second post of my oil painting demo of a Texas Landscape I pick up where I left off in step two.

Since the distant hills are an important secondary area of interest in this painting, I return to add more detail and interest to this area including a distant oak tree and placing of bluebonnets in the distant field. Due to atmospheric perspective all the colors in this area are kept cooler and grayer (less intense) compared to what will be used in the middle and foreground areas to come.

Texas bluebonnet oil painting demo

Feeling I had not yet achieved enough interest I then add another oak tree in the distance. I then move to the far left middle and added the next larger oak with cedar growing underneath and the beginnings of a mesquite tree in front. I like to use an old fan bristle brush that has jagged edges or a cheapo fan brush whereby the hairs break off quickly to mimic the look of the foliage on the mesquite. In spring time the mesquite trees can be an intense yellow green.

bluebonnet oil painting demo

Next in the 5th step I paint in the rock outcropping on the left. When painting rocks remember to think in artistic terms. Don’t think rock, think shapes that will have a top and side planes and they have different values. Light and shadow!

bluebonnet oil painting demo

In my next post I move on to the sky area. Actually I’ve already covered the whole canvas and have started blocking in the middle and foreground bluebonnets. I’ll get caught up on sharing all the steps, but I have a deadline to meet. Busy, busy! Thanks for following along.

 

 

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Oil Painting Demo | Texas Landscape

In my previous post you learned about my large 48×72 commission painting that is to go into a Military hospital at Ford Hood. Being based in Texas the requested commission was to be a Texas landscape with bluebonnets. In the next several posts I will be sharing the progression of this project as an Oil Painting Demo a Texas landscape.

The first step: ( remember to click on the image for an enlargement)

oil painting demo Texas landscape step one

To begin I started with the large Oak tree. Working with a large flat bristle brush I blocked in the light and shadowed areas of the tree foliage to establish the tree’s form. I then added some limb structure.  You may wish to look at this post on How to Paint a Tree which is a very basic approach. Now that I have a basis to compare and judge other color and values I move on to the section behind the large tree. I also established some of the rock outcropping underneath and in front of the tree.

After this painting session I moved to the next adjacent area of importance. The distant hills.

oil painting demo a Texas landscapae with bluebonnets step two

I started with the distant hill with white, ultramarine blue and a speck of cadmium orange to gray it. As the next hill progressed forward I darkened the blue mix with more ultramarine blue. It also made it more intense and less blue gray.  The next layer of hills start showing some structure of trees. It’s a simple area of light and dark, with the values relatively close in range. Shadows are kept in the blue range with the addition of a little violet. The light areas are variations of warm colored grays, however they are cooler in temperature than the colors closer to us.  One of the grays was made by adding cadmium orange to ultramarine blue and then white. This value represented the light on the trees. Some areas had a spec of green added to the mix, but you have to keep away from any strong yellows or you’ll destroy the atmospheric perspective. Ask yourself, why do blue hills made of green trees look blue? The yellow element is missing.

I’ll continue to refine this area and when complete I’ll be sure to include a close up.

 

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Landscape Oil Painting Commission

Recently I was contacted by Distinctive Art Source which is one of only two premiere healthcare art consultancies working exclusively in healthcare in the United States requesting a bluebonnet landscape oil painting commission for the National Intrepid Center of Excellence at Fort Hood. The painting is to be displayed in the reception area. When I asked about the size it was to be a 48″x72″ painting and will be under my Byron signature. This allowed me to keep the price within budget.

Aside from working on a couple of murals in the past, this will be my largest studio painting ever! I’m really looking forward to working on this painting.

My first challenge was the canvas itself. The finished work will be shipped rolled. Thus I would need to stretch the canvas in order to paint it, then undo it in order to ship it. Sounded like a lot of extra work. Could it be made simpler? YES!

I found a great product called Genie Canvas. It’s a collapsible canvas. It all comes in a sturdy tube which is reusable and is a rather unique system. No special tools were required to assemble the canvas. Including the time to open the package, laying out the canvas and assembling it took me about 10 minutes.

Here’s a video showing how the canvas is put together.

And here’s my canvas on the easel. You can see part of my sketch on the canvas. It was done so with cobalt blue thinned with Turpenoid (odorless thinner) and a brush. You can click the image for a larger view.

48x72 commissioned oil painting by Byron copyright 2015

48×72 commissioned oil painting by Byron copyright 2015

The painting you partially see leaning on the bottom edge of the canvas is my latest commission for Sherwood Galllery in Houston, TX. Here it is below.

 

 

 

 

bluebonnet landscape oil painting by William Hagerman

Spring Unfolding 18×24 oil by William Hagerman copyright 2015

I hope you’ll follow along in the next few weeks as I complete this large commissioned painting detailing it’s development.

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